August 17, 2023

The Boston Globe

Three Ways of Looking at Pueblo Art

By Murray Whyte

nstallation view of Grounded In Clay: The Spirit of Pueblo Pottery, on view July 14, 2023 – June 4, 2024. Photo by Richard Lee, courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Installation view of Grounded In Clay: The Spirit of Pueblo Pottery at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Photo by Helen Brooks.

August 13, 2023

The New York Times

Relationships Carved From Clay Bring New Partners to Museums

By Patricia Leigh Brown

nstallation view of Grounded In Clay: The Spirit of Pueblo Pottery, on view July 14, 2023 – June 4, 2024. Photo by Richard Lee, courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Installation view of Grounded In Clay: The Spirit of Pueblo Pottery at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Photo by Helen Brooks.

July/August, 2023

The Magazine ANTIQUES

Clay, Water, and Spirit

By Laura Beach

A water jar made about 1720 by a member of the Zuni people sums up the occasionally fraught history of archaeological research and the preservation movement in the American Southwest. Damaged at a 1922 dinner party convened by members of the Anglo elite, who long dominated northern New Mexico’s legacy cultural institutions, and then repaired, the jar that same year became the first artifact to enter the now more than twelve thousand–object collection of what became the Indian Arts Research Center (IARC) at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe. Along with masterworks from the collection of the Vilcek Foundation, selections from SAR’s holdings form the bulk of Grounded in Clay: The Spirit of Pueblo Pottery, a traveling exhibition making its current stop in New York City.

July 16, 2023

Forbes Magazine

Pueblo Pottery Comes To Manhattan At The Met And Vilcek Foundation

by Chadd Scott

Pueblo pots are not functional things. They are not aesthetic things. They are not one thing or another. They are everything.

You can become part of their stories during an exceptionally rare dual presentation of Pueblo pottery in New York at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and free of charge at the Vilcek Foundation less than a mile away.

Artwork at Vilcek Foundation, Grounded in Clay

“Grounded in Clay: The Spirit of Pueblo Pottery” installation photography at the Vilcek Foundation – Vilcek Foundation

March 31, 2023

Pasatiempo

Grounded in Clay, Rooted in Tradition

By Spencer Fordin

The Mogollon jar is at least 700 years old, and with her fingers, Tara Gatewood (Shirr-whip Tui/Isleta/ Diné) explores its creases and grooves. Her fingertips are tracing the paths of the potter, and for a moment, she’s transported back in time and participating in a conversation with her ancestors…

Mogollon Jar

Mogollon Jar (1050–1300), clay and paint, VF2010.01.01; collection Vilcek Foundation.

March 8, 2023

Hyperallergic

Grounded in Clay and Moved by Spirit

By Joelle E. Mendoza (JEM)

SANTA FE, N. Mex. — “Grounded in Clay does exactly what it’s supposed to do. Ground us in our pursuit of creation,” explains Santiago Romero (Cochiti/Taos/Santa Ana). With tribal and family participation in the exhibition’s curation, Romero lectured and demonstrated “Painted Reflections: Isomeric Design in Ancestral Pueblo Pottery” at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, as part of the show’s ongoing programming. I met him and his cousin, Povi Romero, which led to a shared meal, laughs, and storytelling. Director of the Indian Arts Research Center (IARC) Elysia Poon claimed there is a “serendipitous nature” to this exhibition, which I can attest to…

Director Elysia Poon holds "Water jar" by Franklin Peters (Acoma Pueblo) (2011), clay, paints, 7 5/8 × 10 1/2 inches (all photos by Eve-Lauryn LaFountain)

Director Elysia Poon holds “Water jar” by Franklin Peters (Acoma Pueblo) (2011), clay, paints, 7 5/8 × 10 1/2 inches (photo by Eve-Lauryn LaFountain).

August 26, 2022

Forbes

Indigenous Art in Santa Fe Beyond Indian Market

By

Most of the items seen in “Grounded in Clay” come from the nearby School for Advanced Research which houses the premier collection of Pueblo pottery anywhere in the world. It’s something of a secret as SAR’s work has largely occurred out of the public eye until now. Tours, including its pottery vaults, are offered Fridays at 2:00. Registration is required. Consider this an unmissable experience when visiting Santa Fe. A more powerful combination of art and spirituality may not exist anywhere in the world…

Mogollon Jar

School for Advanced Research pottery vault.

August 5, 2022

Pasatiempo

Down to Earth

By

Santa Fe was founded as La Villa Real de la Santa Fe de San Francisco de Asís (the Royal Town of the Holy Faith of Saint Francis of Assisi), but the Tewa have another name for it: O’gah’poh geh Owingeh (White Shell Water Place). The name is descriptive, yet it communicates an Indigenous idea of the importance of place. La Villa Real de la Santa Fe’s full name commemorates a saint. But O’gah’poh geh Owingeh names it for what’s there: a place that offers up its gifts from the Earth, whether they naturally occur at White Shell Water Place or through trade. The Navajo called it Yootó, a combination of the words for beads and water place.

Mogollon Jar
Acoma water jar (circa 1890-1910), clay and paint, 10.5 inches by 12 inches, IAF.330; image courtesy of School for Advanced Research.

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